spokeart:

"Tiny Objects" by Matt Ritchie
Miniature paintings on hand cut wood, part of Matt’s debut solo show at Spoke Art gallery in San Francisco, CA.
On view August 2nd to August 23rd. 
View this exhibition online via our website here.
Zoom Info
spokeart:

"Tiny Objects" by Matt Ritchie
Miniature paintings on hand cut wood, part of Matt’s debut solo show at Spoke Art gallery in San Francisco, CA.
On view August 2nd to August 23rd. 
View this exhibition online via our website here.
Zoom Info
spokeart:

"Tiny Objects" by Matt Ritchie
Miniature paintings on hand cut wood, part of Matt’s debut solo show at Spoke Art gallery in San Francisco, CA.
On view August 2nd to August 23rd. 
View this exhibition online via our website here.
Zoom Info
spokeart:

"Tiny Objects" by Matt Ritchie
Miniature paintings on hand cut wood, part of Matt’s debut solo show at Spoke Art gallery in San Francisco, CA.
On view August 2nd to August 23rd. 
View this exhibition online via our website here.
Zoom Info
spokeart:

"Tiny Objects" by Matt Ritchie
Miniature paintings on hand cut wood, part of Matt’s debut solo show at Spoke Art gallery in San Francisco, CA.
On view August 2nd to August 23rd. 
View this exhibition online via our website here.
Zoom Info

spokeart:

"Tiny Objects" by Matt Ritchie

Miniature paintings on hand cut wood, part of Matt’s debut solo show at Spoke Art gallery in San Francisco, CA.

On view August 2nd to August 23rd. 

View this exhibition online via our website here.

centuriespast:

DEGAS, EdgarAt the Mirrorc. 1889Pastel on paper, 49 x 64 cmKunsthalle, Hamburg
.For Degas, women were the heroes of modern life, the figures whose actions mattered – and those actions were the gestures of daily living.
– Wendy Lesser

centuriespast:

DEGAS, Edgar
At the Mirror
c. 1889
Pastel on paper, 49 x 64 cm
Kunsthalle, Hamburg

.For Degas, women were the heroes of modern life, the figures whose actions mattered – and those actions were the gestures of daily living.

– Wendy Lesser

theartistsmanifesto:

The Belvedere Torso, by the Athenian sculpture Apollonios, 1st century B.C., Marble, The Vatican Museum. 
This fragmented piece is believed to be of the Greek hero Ajax while he contemplates suicide. 
Zoom Info
theartistsmanifesto:

The Belvedere Torso, by the Athenian sculpture Apollonios, 1st century B.C., Marble, The Vatican Museum. 
This fragmented piece is believed to be of the Greek hero Ajax while he contemplates suicide. 
Zoom Info

theartistsmanifesto:

The Belvedere Torso, by the Athenian sculpture Apollonios, 1st century B.C., Marble, The Vatican Museum. 

This fragmented piece is believed to be of the Greek hero Ajax while he contemplates suicide. 

mesbeauxarts:

Roman, possibly a copy of a lost bronze original by Greek sculptor Leochares (ca. 330 BC). Apollo Belvedere. AD ca. 130-140.
Marble.
Museo Pio-Clementino, Musei Vaticani. Stato della Città del Vaticano.

mesbeauxarts:

Roman, possibly a copy of a lost bronze original by Greek sculptor Leochares (ca. 330 BC). Apollo Belvedere. AD ca. 130-140.

Marble.

Museo Pio-Clementino, Musei Vaticani. Stato della Città del Vaticano.

ancientart:

Laocoön and His Sons, Hellenistic Greek, early 1st century. Pliny attributes this sculpture to three sculptors form Rhodes: Agesander, Polydorus and Athenodoros.
Unearthed in 1506 near the site of the Domus Aurea of the Emperor Nero, the sculpture stands life-sized at a little over 2m. Here, Trojan priest Laocoön, as well as his sons Thymbraeus and Antiphantes, are being strangled by sea serpents after attempting to expose (rightfully) the danger of the Trojan Horse and throwing a spear at it. This was interpreted by the Trojans as proof that the horse was sacred, thus allowing it into their city and sealing their fate.
Literal English translation from the Aeneid (29-19 BC), where Virgil describes the death of Laocoön:

At the same time he stretched forth to tear the knots with his hands
his fillets soaked with saliva and black venom
at the same time he lifted to heaven horrendous cries:
like the bellowing when a wounded bull has fled from the altar
and has shaken the ill-aimed axe from its neck.

Courtesy & currently located at the Vatican Museums, Rome. Photo taken by Jean-Pol GRANDMONT .

ancientart:

Laocoön and His Sons, Hellenistic Greek, early 1st century. Pliny attributes this sculpture to three sculptors form Rhodes: Agesander, Polydorus and Athenodoros.

Unearthed in 1506 near the site of the Domus Aurea of the Emperor Nero, the sculpture stands life-sized at a little over 2m. Here, Trojan priest Laocoön, as well as his sons Thymbraeus and Antiphantes, are being strangled by sea serpents after attempting to expose (rightfully) the danger of the Trojan Horse and throwing a spear at it. This was interpreted by the Trojans as proof that the horse was sacred, thus allowing it into their city and sealing their fate.

Literal English translation from the Aeneid (29-19 BC), where Virgil describes the death of Laocoön:

At the same time he stretched forth to tear the knots with his hands

his fillets soaked with saliva and black venom

at the same time he lifted to heaven horrendous cries:

like the bellowing when a wounded bull has fled from the altar

and has shaken the ill-aimed axe from its neck.

Courtesy & currently located at the Vatican Museums, Rome. Photo taken by Jean-Pol GRANDMONT .